The Great Plague

The Great Plague PDF Author: Stephen Porter
Publisher: Amberley Publishing
ISBN: 1848680872
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 194

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Book Description
Offers a narrative history of the Great Plague which struck England in 1665-66. This title is illustrated with over 80 contemporary images.

The Great Plague

The Great Plague PDF Author: Stephen Porter
Publisher: Amberley Publishing
ISBN: 1848680872
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 194

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Book Description
Offers a narrative history of the Great Plague which struck England in 1665-66. This title is illustrated with over 80 contemporary images.

The Great Plague

The Great Plague PDF Author: A. Lloyd Moote
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 0801892309
Category : Medical
Languages : en
Pages : 408

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Book Description
An intimate portrait of the Great Plague of London. In the winter of 1664-65, a bitter cold descended on London in the days before Christmas. Above the city, an unusually bright comet traced an arc in the sky, exciting much comment and portending "horrible windes and tempests." And in the remote, squalid precinct of St. Giles-in-the-Fields outside the city wall, Goodwoman Phillips was pronounced dead of the plague. Her house was locked up and the phrase "Lord Have Mercy On Us" was painted on the door in red. By the following Christmas, the pathogen that had felled Goodwoman Phillips would go on to kill nearly 100,000 people living in and around London—almost a third of those who did not flee. This epidemic had a devastating effect on the city's economy and social fabric, as well as on those who lived through it. Yet somehow the city continued to function and the activities of daily life went on. In The Great Plague, historian A. Lloyd Moote and microbiologist Dorothy C. Moote provide an engrossing and deeply informed account of this cataclysmic plague year. At once sweeping and intimate, their narrative takes readers from the palaces of the city's wealthiest citizens to the slums that housed the vast majority of London's inhabitants to the surrounding countryside with those who fled. The Mootes reveal that, even at the height of the plague, the city did not descend into chaos. Doctors, apothecaries, surgeons, and clergy remained in the city to care for the sick; parish and city officials confronted the crisis with all the legal tools at their disposal; and commerce continued even as businesses shut down. To portray life and death in and around London, the authors focus on the experiences of nine individuals—among them an apothecary serving a poor suburb, the rector of the city's wealthiest parish, a successful silk merchant who was also a city alderman, a country gentleman, and famous diarist Samuel Pepys. Through letters and diaries, the Mootes offer fresh interpretations of key issues in the history of the Great Plague: how different communities understood and experienced the disease; how medical, religious, and government bodies reacted; how well the social order held together; the economic and moral dilemmas people faced when debating whether to flee the city; and the nature of the material, social, and spiritual resources sustaining those who remained. Underscoring the human dimensions of the epidemic, Lloyd and Dorothy Moote dramatically recast the history of the Great Plague and offer a masterful portrait of a city and its inhabitants besieged by—and defiantly resisting—unimaginable horror.

The Great Plague in London in 1665

The Great Plague in London in 1665 PDF Author: Walter George Bell
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Medicine
Languages : en
Pages : 440

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Book Description
Thomson, George.

The Great Plague of London

The Great Plague of London PDF Author: Charles River
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781545127049
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 48

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Book Description
*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts of the plague *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "The trend of recent research is pointing to a figure more like 45-50% of the European population dying during a four-year period. There is a fair amount of geographic variation. In Mediterranean Europe, areas such as Italy, the south of France and Spain, where plague ran for about four years consecutively, it was probably closer to 75-80% of the population. In Germany and England ... it was probably closer to 20%." - Philip Daileader, medieval historian In the 14th century, a ruthless killer stalked the streets of England, wiping out up to 60% of the terror-stricken nation's inhabitants. This invisible and unforgiving terminator continued to harass the population for hundreds of years, but nothing could compare to the savagery it would unleash 3 centuries later. This conscienceless menace was none other than the notorious bubonic plague, also known as the "Black Death." The High Middle Ages had seen a rise in Western Europe's population in previous centuries, but these gains were almost entirely erased as the plague spread rapidly across all of Europe from 1346-1353. With a medieval understanding of medicine, diagnosis, and illness, nobody understood what caused Black Death or how to truly treat it. As a result, many religious people assumed it was divine retribution, while superstitious and suspicious citizens saw a nefarious human plot involved and persecuted certain minority groups among them. Though it is now widely believed that rats and fleas spread the disease by carrying the bubonic plague westward along well-established trade routes, and there are now vaccines to prevent the spread of the plague, the Black Death gruesomely killed upwards of 100 million people, with helpless chroniclers graphically describing the various stages of the disease. It took Europe decades for its population to bounce back, and similar plagues would affect various parts of the world for the next several centuries, but advances in medical technology have since allowed researchers to read various medieval accounts of the Black Death in order to understand the various strains of the disease. Furthermore, the social upheaval caused by the plague radically changed European societies, and some have noted that by the time the plague had passed, the Late Middle Ages would end with many of today's European nations firmly established. In the mid-17th century, the heart of England fell victim to the mother of all epidemic catastrophes. The city of London was a ghost town, deserted by those who knew better than to hang around in a breeding ground that offered near-certain doom. Those who were confined within the city's borders had to make do with what they had, and the pitifully low morale seemed appropriate; the reek of rot and decomposition pervaded the air day in and day out, while corpses, young and old, riddled with strange swellings and blackened boils, littered the streets. For Londoners, to say it was hell would be an understatement. The Great Plague of London: The History and Legacy of England's Last Major Outbreak of the Bubonic Plague explores the horrific disaster, its origins, the peculiar precautions and curious cures designed to combat the disease, and the sobering legacy it has left behind. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Great Plague of London like never before.

My Story: The Great Plague

My Story: The Great Plague PDF Author: Pamela Oldfield
Publisher: Scholastic UK
ISBN: 1407132911
Category : Juvenile Fiction
Languages : en
Pages : 160

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Book Description
A time of horror has come to London. In one terrible summer, more than 15% of its population will perish. As the bubonic plague ravages London's streets, mercilessly plucking up victims and filling the plague pits with corpses, 13-year-old Alice Paynton records the outbreak in her diary. "It seems that in the past week 700 people have died of the plague. So the plague has well and truly come to London... One of the houses in the next street had a red cross painted on the door. Above the cross someone had chalked Lord Have Mercy Upon Us." Alice's chilling diary brings alive one of the darkest moments in British history: the Great Plague of 1665-1666.

History of the Plague in London

History of the Plague in London PDF Author: Daniel Defoe
Publisher: LA CASE Books
ISBN:
Category : Fiction
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
The History of the Plague in London is a historical novel offering an account of the dismal events caused by the Great Plague, which mercilessly struck the city of London in 1665. First published in 1722, the novel illustrates the social disorder triggered by the outbreak, while focusing on human suffering and the mere devastation occupying London at the time. Defoe opens his book with the introduction of his fictional character H.F., a middle-class man who decides to wait out the destruction of the plague instead of fleeing to safety, and is presented only by his initials throughout the novel. Consequently, the narrator records many distressing stories as experienced by London residents, including craze affected people wandering the streets aimlessly, locals trying to escape the disease infected city, and healthy families forced to confine themselves behind closed doors. Apart from these second-hand accounts, the narrator also provides a thorough explanation on how quarantine was managed and kept under control. In addition, he seeks to debunk all squalid rumors which have produced a false interpretation of the bubonic plague. However, not everything is bleak in the account, as the novel offers some affirmative evidence that humanity is still capable of charity, kindness and mercy even in the midst of chaos and confusion. Although regarded as a work of fiction, the author engrosses with his insertion of statistics, government reports and charts which further validate the novel as a precise portrayal the Great Plague.

A Journal of the Plague Year

A Journal of the Plague Year PDF Author: Daniel Defoe
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 165

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Book Description
In a striking resemblance to 21st-century pandemics, A Journal of the Plague Year recounts one man's experiences during the Great Plague of London in 1665. As the government of London tries to contain the disease by banning public gatherings, closing schools, and quarantining infected people, the narrator gives the reader a comprehensive look at the terrifying life inside the plague-ridden city. Written by Daniel Defoe in 1722, the book is likely based on the personal journals of Defoe's uncle, Henry Fue, who was a saddler in East London during the Black Death. This illustrated, vintage-style edition of "Plague Year" seeks to deliver the atmosphere of the Great Plague of London to modern readers with a sense of truth and realism unmatched by any other book.

The City Remembrancer

The City Remembrancer PDF Author: Gideon Harvey
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : London (England)
Languages : en
Pages : 486

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Book Description


The History of the Great Plague in London in the Year 1665

The History of the Great Plague in London in the Year 1665 PDF Author: Daniel Defoe
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Great Plague, London, England, 1664-1666
Languages : en
Pages : 334

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Book Description


A Journal of the Plague Year

A Journal of the Plague Year PDF Author: Daniel Defoe
Publisher: Legare Street Press
ISBN: 9781020520815
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 0

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Book Description
This famous account of the Great Plague of London in 1665 is a fictionalized tale written by Daniel Defoe, one of the pioneers of the English novel. Although fictitious, the book is an excellent historical source on the plague, as Defoe was a young child during the outbreak and relied on his own memories, as well as his uncle's journals, for much of his information. Through Defoe's vivid descriptions, readers can experience the fear and horror of the plague firsthand, as well as the social and economic effects it had on the city of London. A must-read for anyone interested in the history of disease epidemics! This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the "public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.